© 2019 Emer Casey Fun Run (Aus) Inc

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 OVER 1000 WOMEN 

 WILL DIE FROM 

 OVARIAN CANCER 

 IN AUSTRALIA IN 2019 

EMER CASEY REPORT 2018
EMER CASEY AND THE FUN RUN

The fun run’s namesake, Emer Casey, was a young Irish woman who died of ovarian cancer in June 2006 at the age of 28. Her death had a huge impact on her family and friends. They felt there was little known or information about ovarian cancer compared with other cancers and they were shocked to find out there was no early detection test for the disease. Emer’s family and friends vowed to do all they could to help progress research into ovarian cancer. They set up the Emer Casey Foundation, a registered Irish charity. The purpose of the Foundation is to raise funds for research into ovarian cancer, in particular research that will assist developing an early detection test for the disease.

 

One of the Foundation’s biggest fundraisers is a fun run that takes place in Emer’s home town in Youghal, Co. Cork, Ireland. As Emer's friends moved abroad, fun runs were set up around the world including in London and Melbourne. All funds raised in Melbourne are donated locally to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre to support its research into ovarian cancer.

 

The Emer Casey Fun Run for Ovarian Cancer started in Melbourne in 2008. That year it had 17 participants. In 2018 the Emer Casey Fun Run had over 500 participants and raised $53,816. In total over the last 11 years the event has raised over $330,000 for ovarian cancer research.

THE HARD TRUTH

1046

Estimated number of deaths from ovarian cancer in 2019

45.7%

Chance of surviving at least 5 years (2011–15)

4.8%

Estimated % of all female deaths from cancer in 2017

Ovarian cancer occurs when abnormal cells in the ovary, fallopian tube or peritoneum grow in an uncontrolled way.

The ovaries are a pair of organs in the female reproductive system, located on each side of the uterus. They produce eggs and hormones.

Ovarian cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body to form secondary cancers, in a process called metastasis.

For further information https://ovarian-cancer.canceraustralia.gov.au/